Courses Offered by Program

The sociology program offers classes with explicit community engagement strategies, designed for students to learn and understand how the public sector and non-profit agencies work and to apply what they are learning in the community. The program also offers a number of service learning courses where students can receive credit for working with non-profits organizations. Meet with an advisor and check out the rotation of courses in the department of sociology and anthropology before scheduling your classes.

Sociology (SOC) courses

  • SOC 150 Introduction to Society

    General Education Course (Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences).

    The study of society including its structure and operation from the perspective of sociology. The course focuses on ways society is constructed by people and, in turn, on the ways society shapes people. This general education course supplies students with a community as well as global, multicultural understanding of society.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 152 Social Problems in the Community

    Prerequisite: 12 hours.

    General Education Course (Focus on Public Issues).

    Sociological perspectives on contemporary social issues and problems in American society that are faced by today's communities. A public sociology focus is addressed in this course. This general education course will allow students to recognize the importance of contributing their knowledge and experiences to help resolve social problems in their own community and the broader society.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 300 Service Learning Curricular Component

    Prerequisite: 30 hours and concurrent registration in a Sociology course designated as service learning offering.

    An integrative learning experience which addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs by incorporating community service with classroom instruction. Includes 40 hours on-task service to a community organization, agency or public service provider. The community service placement agency and service assignment will vary, dependent on the disciplinary course topic and learning objectives. May be repeated.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 301 Research Methodology

    Prerequisite: SOC 150.

    Methods of collecting and analyzing data including interviewing and observation techniques, scaling and sampling designs.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 302 Statistics for Social Research

    Prerequisite: sophomore standing and completion of MTH 130 or higher.

    It is recommended that Sociology majors taking SOC 302 concurrently enroll in SOC 303. Introduction to statistics with special emphasis on those techniques most commonly used in social research. This course cannot be credited toward a degree if a student has taken any of the following: AGR 330, MTH 340, PSY 200, QBA 237, REC 328, SOC 302.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 303 Quantitative Methods Lab

    Prerequisite: SOC 302 (or equivalent) or concurrent enrollment.

    It is recommended that all Sociology majors enrolled in SOC 302 concurrently enroll in SOC 303. An introduction to and application of quantitative social science data analysis.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    0
    Lab contact hours:
    2

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 305 Population Analysis

    Comparative analysis of population size, distribution, and composition; population processes of fertility, mortality and migration; impact of population change on society; issues of population policy.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 309 Work, Industry, and Society

    The industrialization of society and its impact on formal and informal organization, management philosophies, worker attitudes and labor relations. Current trends affecting the work place are examined.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 310 Social Deviance

    An historical survey of the explanations of deviant behavior. Emphasis will focus on the structure of norms and rules, their diversity, and their role in identifying deviance.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 311 Sociology of Sexuality

    This course studies a wide range of sexual phenomena from a sociological perspective. Sociologists know that sex does not happen in a vacuum. To the contrary, sex is tied up with history, culture, politics, and power. Though we like to believe that our sexual behavior is a private experience untouched by society, sexual desire and sexual activity are in fact structured by social interactions. We can see this in the way that sexuality, sexual practice, and sexual identity are not static concepts, but rather are fluid and different throughout time and space.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall (even-numbered years), Spring (even-numbered years)

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 315 The Family

    The family as a social institution; its adjustment to modern social conditions; personality adjustments in marriage.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 316 Urban Sociology

    The rise and development of urban settlements (cities), their ecology, problems, and an examination of urbanism as a way of life generated in cities.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 319 Environmental Sociology

    This course examines the causes and consequences of environmental problems, environmental movements, impacts of technological change, environmental policy and the state, environmental values, attitudes, and behaviors. Specific topics will vary, but may include resource scarcity, toxics, overconsumption, agricultural production, and more.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 320 Political Sociology

    Introduces students to a sociological analysis of political organization forms and their relations with other elements of social life. Students examine the concept of power and the intersection of personality, social structure, and politics. The course also emphasizes how social inequality between groups (e.g. race, class, and gender, etc.) influences politics and elaborates major social trends affecting the political process including how various social forces work to change political policies.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 325 Introduction to Sociological Theory

    Prerequisite: SOC 150.

    A survey of the development of sociological theory with emphasis upon the social and historical influences shaping the thought of classical theorists.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 326 Feminist Theories of Social Order

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 or GST 170.

    This course offers an introductory survey of feminist theories within a sociological framework. Students will read and discuss significant classical and contemporary feminist writings on how social life is organized, maintained or changed. The feminist literature has led to the emergence of diverse theoretical frameworks analyzing historical and contemporary, macro and micro, public and private, local and global issues and concerns. The feminist paradigm, like many other paradigms, is inclusive of many disciplines. The sociological writings within this paradigm provide a wealth of materials on alternative views of social organization, order and conflict. Identical with GST 326. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 326 and GST 326.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 332 Juvenile Delinquency

    This course examines the topic of juvenile delinquency from a sociological perspective. Emphasis is placed on measuring and explaining the occurrence of delinquency in the United States. The course also takes a critical look at societal responses to the delinquency problem, including the juvenile justice system.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 336 Race and Ethnicity

    This course explores the social construction of race and ethnicity. Issues of differential power between racial and ethnic groups and the economic, political, and social structures which are utilized to maintain these power differences are identified. Social movements and social policies designed to address social inequality, prejudice and discrimination are also examined.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 337 Sociology of Gender

    This course focuses on gender differences, patterns, and inequalities. It analyzes the social construction of gender, femininities and masculinities, gender socialization, and how gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality. Specific attention is paid to the significance of gender in interaction, culture, and social institutions, including work, politics, media, and the family.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 341 Medical Sociology

    An analysis of the ecological, sociopsychological and cultural aspects of health and illness, both physical and mental, and of the social organization of health care services and of health professions.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 357 Sociology of Sport

    Investigation and analysis of the relationship between sport and society; the development and changing nature of sport as an institution; role of sport in modern society.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 360 The Individual in Society

    This course explores how self understanding emerges in a social context and is inseparable from that context. It examines the symbolic basis of communication, traces the interdependency of self and other awareness, and probes the social organization of human experience.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 375 Social Forces and Aging

    Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

    This course examines the aging process, demographic trends, and the social, economic, and social-psychological aspects of aging in the United States. Students will be introduced to current theories on aging in social gerontology and their application to the everyday lives of older people. Topics of interest include social attitudes toward aging, family and social bonds, work and retirement, gender issues, ethnicity and aging, living environments, and approaches to aging well. Students will learn about the role of federal, state and local agencies in meeting the needs of the elderly. Identical with GER 310. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 375 and GER 310.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 380 Sociology of Law

    The interaction of law and society from a sociological perspective with emphasis upon legal institutions as instruments of social control. The impact of social values on the development of the legal order and the reciprocal influence of the law on social behavior.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 384 Social Movements

    The study of collective attempts to implement social change in society. Specific groups studied will vary, but may include the civil rights, feminist, political, religious, environmental and health movements.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 390 Religion in Society

    Examines the relationship between religion and its social context. Students will explore the social nature of individual religious institutions. The relationship between religion and modernity will be studied. The course will pay special attention to the role of religion in American society, as well as the religious dimensions of class, gender, region, and race/ethnicity. Identical with REL 390. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 390 and REL 390. May be taught concurrently with SOC 790. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 390 and SOC 790.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 391 The Holocaust - A Sociological Introduction

    This course explores the social history of the Holocaust, its probable causes, magnitude, operation, consequences and the controversies which surround its study. Discussion ranges into the areas of sociology of religion and of law in order to understand compelling issues raised by this example of genocide.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    1
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 397 Special Topics

    Selected topics of contemporary interest in Sociology. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours when the topic changes. Variable content course.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 398 Public Sociology and Community Studies

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 and Sociology major or minor.

    Explores how Public Sociology is practiced and connected to the local community. Provides conceptual tools for analyzing communities and creates a foundation for meaningful community engagement. Each section will apply sociological theories and methods to a specific community issue or problem. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 420 Social Inequality

    Prerequisite: SOC 150.

    An analysis of the structure, sources, and consequences of social inequality and the dimensions along which it may be observed.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 425 Advanced Sociological Theory

    Prerequisite: SOC 325.

    This course provides an in-depth analysis of a particular theorist, e.g. Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, W.E.B. DuBois, Jane Addams; or theoretical orientation, e.g. symbolic interactionism, critical theory, dependency theory.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 456 Food in Society

    This course examines how procuring food impacts societal organization and is a catalyst for social change. The basic premise of this course is that understanding how a society feeds itself will reveal many sociological insights such as the distribution of wealth and power and the health of individuals and communities.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    3
    Lab contact hours:
    0

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 470 Practicum in Applied Sociological Research

    Prerequisite: SOC 301, SOC 302, SOC 325 and permission of instructor.

    Group experience in designing and carrying out an applied community research project. Variable content course.

    Credit hours:
    3
    Lecture contact hours:
    2
    Lab contact hours:
    4

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 492 Program Assessment and Career Preparation

    Prerequisite: senior standing and permission of instructor.

    All students majoring in Sociology are required to enroll in this course during their senior year. The focus is on program assessment rather than on individual student evaluation, and on career preparation for upcoming graduates. Students will complete several program-specific assessments of learning outcomes, and they will receive information to help them prepare for the job market or graduate school. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hours:
    1
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Fall, Spring

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 497 Special Topics

    Prerequisite: 9 hours sociology and permission of instructor.

    Selected topics in substantive areas in sociology such as theory, methodology, social organization, social psychology, demography, criminology and family. Offered when resources and demand allow. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours when topic changes. Variable content course.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 499 Internship in Applied Sociology

    Prerequisite: 18 hours in Sociology and permission of instructor.

    Supervised work experience in business, industry, governmental, institutional and/or agency settings where sociological skills are utilized. One credit hour for each 45 clock hours on the job. No more than 3 hours internship credit may be applied to the Sociology major.

    Credit hours:
    1-6
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 596 Directed Readings in Sociology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous Sociology courses. Includes a wide selection from literature in the field. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours, but no more than 6 hours may be applied to the sociology major. May be taught concurrently with SOC 697. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 697 and SOC 596.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 599 Sociological Research

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 and SOC 301 and SOC 302 and SOC 325 and permission of instructor.

    Independent and/or group work in research methodology, data manipulation and presentation in selected fields of sociology. May be repeated to total of 9 hours.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings

  • SOC 697 Directed Readings in Sociology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous Sociology courses. Includes a wide selection from literature in the field. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours, but no more than 6 hours may be applied to the sociology major. May be taught concurrently with SOC 596. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 596 and SOC 697.

    Credit hours:
    1-3
    Lecture contact hours:
    Lab contact hours:

    Typically offered: Upon demand

    Projected offerings